New Wave of 2D Boron

Rice University researchers say 2-D boron may be best for flexible electronics

2d-b-waveThough they’re touted as ideal for electronics, two-dimensional materials like graphene may be too flat and hard to stretch to serve in flexible, wearable devices. “Wavy” borophene might be better, according to Rice University scientists.

The Rice lab of theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and experimental collaborators observed examples of naturally undulating, metallic borophene, an atom-thick layer of boron, and suggested that transferring it onto an elastic surface would preserve the material’s stretchability along with its useful electronic properties.

Highly conductive graphene has promise for flexible electronics, Yakobson said, but it is too stiff for devices that also need to stretch, compress or even twist. But borophene deposited on a silver substrate develops nanoscale corrugations. Weakly bound to the silver, it could be moved to a flexible surface for use.

The research appears this month in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters.

In The News

Polyphony in B flat

At last, experiments offer two-dimensional boron… on a silver platterb_cards

In an extensive “News & Views” in Nature Chemistry, we provide a critical view of the latest breakthrough in materials flatland: the synthesis of two-dimensional boron. It also reflects on a decade-long effort in Yakobson’s group towards understanding and eventually predicting the structure of low-dimensional boron: from the B80 fullerene, to the polymorphism of 2D boron, to practical routes for its synthesis.

2D Boron among the Angew. Chem. covers

angew_chem_cover

Two-dimensional boron would take different forms, depending on the substrate used in chemical vapor deposition growth. Image by Zhuzha Zhang

Our most recent work on 2D boron will be featured on a cover of the upcoming issue of Angewandte Chemie International Edition. The study builds on two of our previous works on two-dimensional boron [1, 2]  and provides further clues as to how this elusive material can be synthesized and what the product may look like.

Calculation of the atom-by-atom energies involved in creating a sheet of boron revealed that the metal substrate – the surface upon which two-dimensional materials are grown in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace – would make all the difference.

The new calculations show it may be possible to guide the formation of 2D boron by tailoring boron-metal interactions.Theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and his Rice colleagues discovered that copper, a common substrate in graphene growth, might be best to obtain flat boron, while other metals would guide the resulting material in their unique ways.

1.
Y. Liu, E. S. Penev, B. I. Yakobson, Probing the Synthesis of Two-Dimensional Boron by First-Principles Computations. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52, 3156–3159 (2013).
1.
E. S. Penev, S. Bhowmick, A. Sadrzadeh, B. I. Yakobson, Polymorphism of Two-Dimensional Boron. Nano Lett. 12, 2441–2445 (2012).

– See more at: Rice News